MoP 2 : A One-Way Conversation

We’re not particularly looking to blog about censorship. In general, we think the problem (in, e.g., Australia and the US) is overhyped. The much greater problem is self-censorship, where the media and the society at large can’t think or write about what they fail to see; so, for example, a major country can have a military coup, but no one seems to notice. Sometimes, however, the issue is close enough to home and the censorship is sufficiently blatant, that it seems worth noting.

Greg Ashman, who we had cause to mention recently, has been censored in a needless and heavy-handed manner by Sasha Petrova, the education editor of The Conversation. The details are discussed by Ashman here, but it is easy to give the story in brief.

Kate Noble of the Mitchell Institute wrote an article for The Conversation, titled Children learn through play – it shouldn’t stop at pre-school. As the title suggests, Noble was arguing for more play-based learning in the early years of primary school. Ashman then added a (polite and referenced and carefully worded) comment, noting Noble’s failure to distinguish between knowledge that is more susceptible or less susceptible to play-based learning, and directly querying one of Noble’s examples, the possible learning benefits (or lack thereof) of playing with water. Ashman’s comment, along with the replies to his comment, was then deleted. When Ashman emailed Petrova, querying this, Petrova replied:

“Sure. I deleted [Ashman’s comment] as it is off topic. The article doesn’t call for less explicit instruction, nor is there any mention of it. It calls for more integration of play-based learning in early years of school to ease the transition to formal instruction – not that formal instruction (and even here it doesn’t specify that formal means “explicit”) must be abolished.”

Subsequently, it appears that Petrova has also deleted the puzzled commentary on the original deletion. And, who knows what else she has deleted? Such is the nature of censorship.

In general we have a lot of sympathy for editors, such as Petrova, of public fora. It is very easy to err one way or the other, and then to be hammered by Team A or Team B.  Indeed, and somewhat ironically, Ashman had a post just a week ago that was in part critical of The Conversation’s new policy towards climate denialist loons; in that instance we thought Ashman was being a little tendentious and our sympathies were much more with The Conversation’s editors.

But, here, Petrova has unquestionably screwed up. Ashman was adding important, directly relevant and explicitly linked qualification to Noble’s article, and in a properly thoughtful and collegial manner. Ashman wasn’t grandstanding, he was contributing in good faith. He was conversing.  Moreover, Petrova’s stated reason for censoring Ashman is premised on a ludicrously narrow definition of “topic”, which even on its own terms fails here, and in any case has no place in academic discourse or public discourse.

Petrova, and The Conversation, owes Ashman an apology.

Implicit Suggestions

One of the unexpected and rewarding aspects of having started this blog is being contacted out of the blue by students. This included an extended correspondence with one particular VCE student, whom we have never met and of whom we know very little, other than that this year they undertook UMEP mathematics (Melbourne University extension). The student emailed again recently, about the final question on this year’s (calculator-free) Specialist Mathematics Exam 1 (not online). Though perhaps not (but also perhaps yes) a WitCH, the exam question (below), and the student’s comments (belower), seemed worth sharing.

Hi Marty,

Have a peek at Question 10 of Specialist 2019 Exam 1 when you get a chance. It was a 5 mark question, only roughly 2 of which actually assessed relevant Specialist knowledge – the rest was mechanical manipulation of ugly fractions and surds. Whilst I happened to get the right answer, I know of talented others who didn’t.

I saw a comment you made on the blog regarding timing sometime recently, and I couldn’t agree more. I made more stupid mistakes than I would’ve liked on the Specialist exam 2, being under pressure to race against the clock. It seems honestly pathetic to me that VCAA can only seem to differentiate students by time. (Especially when giving 2 1/2 hours for science subjects, with no reason why they can’t do the same for Maths.) It truly seems a pathetic way to assess or distinguish between proper mathematical talent and button-pushing speed writing.

I definitely appreciate the UMEP exams. We have 3 hrs and no CAS! That, coupled with the assignments that expect justification and insight, certainly makes me appreciate maths significantly more than from VCE. My only regret on that note was that I couldn’t do two UMEP subjects 🙂

UPDATE (22/4) The examination report has appeared.

 

See the Evil Mathologer and the Evil Marty, December 3

On Tuesday December 3, the Australian Mathematics Society will hold a free education afternoon at Monash University, Clayton, as part of their annual conference. The talk details are below, and full details are here (and the lecture theatre details are below). You aren’t required to register, but you can do so here (and it is appreciated if you do).

UPDATE The talks will take place in Lecture theatre G81 of the Learning & Teaching Building (the bus stop side of Clayton campus). There’s a map of Clayton campus here.

**************************************************

1:30 Joanna Sikora: Advancing Women in Australian Mathematics: context, challenges and achievements

This talk reviews recent research undertaken by social scientists on women in mathematics. First, adopting a life-course perspective it summarises findings on the persisting gap in vocational interest in mathematics among adolescent boys and girls, including its potential to widen over time. Systematic differences between boys and girls in the choice of basic and advanced mathematics for ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank) are discussed. Next, the consequences of these choices for tertiary education specialisations and availability of suitably qualified male and female graduates are considered.

Following this introduction, the talk summarizes research on underrepresentation of women in mathematics departments in Australia and across the world. The focus is on structural and institutional process which, over the course of individual careers, can amount to significant disadvantage even in the absence of overt discrimination. Topics discussed include cultural stereotypes that link perceptions of brilliance and academic talent with masculinity, gender differences in professional capital, i.e. peer esteem, accorded to male and female mathematicians, the gender gap in rates of publications and impact, documented bias in student evaluations and factors that enable success in establishing international collaborations. The talk concludes by summarizing the literature on practical steps that we can take to improve gender equity.

2:20 Julia Collins and Katherine Seaton: Knitting and Folding Mathematics

Mathematical thinking is not confined to mathematicians, but one place you may not expect to find it is in the world of crafts. Even the most maths-anxious knitters will display an astonishing familiarity with concepts from geometry, topology, number theory and coding, while modern origami artists are turning to mathematical algorithms to create models previously thought to be unfoldable. This talk will highlight a number of surprising connections between maths and craft, and will be followed by a hands-on session facilitated by Maths Craft Australia where people can create some mathematical craft for themselves. (Knitting/crochet needles and origami paper will be provided, but participants are also encouraged to bring their own! Knitting in the audience is strictly encouraged.)

2:45 Afternoon Tea

3:10 Marty Ross: How I teach, why the Mathologer is evil, and other indiscrete thoughts

In this shamelessly narcissistic talk I will reveal the One True Secret to teaching mathematics. Along the way I will explain why you can and should ignore STEM, calculators, Mathematica, iPads, the evil Mathologer, constructivism, growth mindset, SOLO, Bloom, flipping classrooms, centering children, lesson plans, skeleton notes, professional standards and professional development and many other modern absurdities.

3:35 David Treeby: How to Instil Mathematical Culture in Secondary Education

Over the past few decades, mathematicians have ceded the educational space to two groups: mathematics educators and technology companies. This has had a dire effect on what mathematics is taught and how it is taught. The result is a commodified brand of distorted mathematics. This talk will focus on how some well-resourced schools have resisted these changes, and how broad and equitable change will require the support of working mathematicians and their professional bodies.

4:00 Burkard Polster: Mathologer: explaining tricky maths on YouTube

In this session I’ll talk about my experience running the YouTube channel Mathologer and I’ll give you a sneak peek of the video that I am currently working on.

WitCH 29: Bad Roots

This one is double-barrelled. A strange multiple choice question appeared in the 2019 NHT Mathematical Methods Exam 2 (CAS). We had thought to let it pass, but a similar question appeared in last’s weeks Methods exam (no link yet, but the Study Design is here). So, here we go.

First, the NHT question:

The examination report indicates the correct answer, C, and provides a suggested solution:

\Large\color{blue} \boldsymbol{ g(x)=f^{-1}(x)=\frac{x^{\frac15}-b}{a},\ g'(x) = \frac{x^{-\frac45}}{5a},\ g'(1) = \frac1{5a}}

And, here’s last week’s question (with no examination report yet available):